Farm Spotlight: Langwater Farm

A healthy field of beets

A healthy field of beets

When you think of a classic organic New England farm, you’re probably picturing something close to Langwater Farm. Fields full of long, straight rows of vegetables, bordered with trees and ringed around with a rutted, muddy string of dirt roads. Here and there a large John Deere tractor standing tall over the kale and broccoli. A big barn full of curing garlic and onions. A bustling farm stand, cashiers with young faces, lots of pumpkins out front. This is the world created by Kevin and Kate O’Dwyer, the owners and managers of Langwater Farm.

Farm work has been in Kevin O’Dwyer’s life from early on; a native of eastern Massachusetts, he started working at Wards Berry Farm in Sharon at the age of 14. Before that, he was always helping out in his mother’s garden, learning to appreciate what the soil can give us. He went to college at UMass Lowell, where he met a girl named Kate. Kate and Kevin got married pretty soon after that, and moved back to the Sharon area, where Kevin became head grower at Wards Berry Farm (growing all kinds of fruits and veggies, not just berries!).

A luxuriant head of purple cabbage at Langwater

A luxuriant head of purple cabbage at Langwater

A John Deere Tractor

A John Deere Tractor

When Kevin decided he wanted to start his own farm in 2010, it just so happened that the Ames family, longtime owners of an 80-acre parcel of forest and agricultural land in Easton, were looking for a farmer to take over management of the property. At this point Kate was working as a social worker, which became essential for their growing family when Kevin decided to start his own farm. Kate supported the family on her salary while Kevin went about establishing the new farm. They took out a loan from Farm Credit East, and they were off. The first year, they built a farm stand and bought a tractor. The barn came the following winter. Grants followed for a greenhouse and equipment from the National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), one of the few branches of the USDA that is helpful to smaller organic growers. It takes a lot of luck, money, and moral support to start a farm, and it seems like Kevin and Kate got some of each at just the right times. A bit of a small-farm-fairytale.

A pumpkin ready for harvest

A pumpkin ready for harvest

Demand grew and grew as the community around Easton embraced Langwater. The farm slowly expanded to match it, and along with the farm so did the O’Dwyer family. Kevin and Kate now have three daughters – Madison, 8; Rachel, 6; and Charlotte, 3 – who all love to help out in the field. Eventually the farm was successful enough that Kate quit her job and went to work full time with Kevin. These days, Kate manages the sales, making sure the farm stand, wholesale business, and farmers markets all run smoothly, while Kevin runs the field operations.

Kevin turns a cover crop into the soil

Kevin turns a cover crop into the soil

In 2014 the O’Dwyers expanded to another 26 acres of land, which was used in large part to increase the amount of cover cropping they did. Cover cropping is a restorative practice for agricultural land, where after harvesting and clearing a field of production crops, the farmer thickly sows grasses like rye and oats, to increase nutrients and organic matter in the soil, as well as legumes like peas, vetch, and clover, which fix nitrogen from the air into the ground. All of this makes for a healthy, resilient soil with a good consistency for growing. An especially popular time to plant cover crops is late summer and early fall. That crop will mature in the late fall, and some of it right into the winter, and will get turned in in the spring, making for a much richer, more workable soil to plant into.

Kevin with his tomatoes

Kevin with his tomatoes

When I found Kevin in the barn, he didn’t have much time to talk about cover cropping or expansion or anything really. I found him with the vegetable he likes best – inspecting tomatoes in the processing area. Kevin is obsessed with tomatoes, always has been. The O’Dwyer’s have actually won trophies for their tomatoes. He seemed as if he would have been happy to stand there all day, chatting and handling his tomatoes, but unfortunately when you run a farm with a big staff and lots of fields, time is short.

Liz, with a hot pepper backdrop

Liz, with a hot pepper backdrop

Most of my day at Langwater was spent with Liz, a young woman with the quiet and calm of someone older, who was very adept at guiding the old two-wheel-drive truck we rode in over field roads that looked more lake than road. She gave me the tour and graciously put up with my questions, whereby I learned that she has been working at Langwater for three years, after some seasons at a couple other farms. After college Liz, like most people, wasn’t really sure what she wanted to do. She ended up doing a lot of WWOOFing – doing work-stays on small, organic farms that are listed on the site of the World Wide Opportunites on Organic Farms organization. Those work-stays sparked a life-long passion, and now she can’t picture herself doing anything else. She didn’t grow up gardening or farming – something that is more and more common among new employees and owners of locally-based organic farms. Nowadays, Liz works full time at Langwater and actually runs her own 20-person CSA on the side. She says she would like to have her own farm one day, maybe on a smaller scale than Langwater. Her favorite vegetable is kale. 

Happy man with weed-whacker

Happy man with weed-whacker

After wandering through pepper and tomato plantings, squashes, flowers, and greens, we ended up at a field of corn, where a man with a heavy-duty weed whacker was getting ready to cut a corn maze. Langwater has lots of ways to get the local community involved in the farm. They have a corn maze every year, they do pick-your-own strawberries, tomatoes, flowers, and pumpkins, they sell fresh apple cider and cider donuts in the fall, and of course they have their farm stand, which is open every day of the week except Monday.

Come check out their produce at the Brookline Market – or at their farm, if you’re in the Sharon area! Kevin’s tomatoes may be going out of season now, but their winter squashes, cool-weather greens, and root vegetables will keep you cooking up some yummy meals all the way to Thanksgiving.

Sunflower with a bee! Their sunflowers are huge. It’s bonkers.

Sunflower with a bee! Their sunflowers are huge. It’s bonkers.

Farm Spotlight: Assawaga Farm

by Nate Harlan

    

A bed of carrots

A bed of carrots

        Digging carrots out of the earth is extremely satisfying, especially when you get to do it with your bare hands. You plunge your arm into the soil and grasp the top half of the carrot, giving it a little wiggle to loosen its downward grip, and then pull up and out. It’s a magic trick that you get to repeat over and over again, until your bin is full. Then you walk your bin down to the end of the bed, put leaves or something over it to shade the carrots, and start a new bin where you left off. You continue this until either you run out of carrots or, like we did at Assawaga Farm last week, you decide to take a watermelon break.

A field of crops with the barn in the background

A field of crops with the barn in the background

            As we moved down our opposite sides of the carrot bed, Yoko told me a bit about how she and Alex ended up starting a farm in northeastern Connecticut. Born in Venezuela to Japanese parents, Yoko Takemura grew up bouncing around the globe, from Japan to Australia and beyond. After a stint working in investment banking she finally landed in New York for graduate school, where she got her master’s in Environmental Sustainability and her dream of starting a farm was born. Before too long she had thrown her big city consulting job to the wayside and was working full time at an organic farm in Connecticut. It was during that time that she met Alex Carpenter, who was working as an electrician after spending years traveling the world. The two of them soon realized they shared the same dream of creating a small, sustainable farm. So they took their savings and bought a few acres of land about an hour and a half drive from Boston, started preparing the land, built a barn, and they were off. Now they grow most all kinds of standard market veggies – kale, chard, squash, tomatoes, carrots, etc – as well as some Japanese ones you might not have seen at a market before, like shiso, komatsuna, and daikon radish.

            Sitting on a bucket in the shade of their new barn, I got to eat some really terrific watermelon as I listened to Alex and Yoko talk about their farm – what they wanted to get done that day, their plans for the future, how good the watermelon was. The couple started Assawaga Farm in 2017, making them one of the youngest farms in New England and by far the youngest of our farm vendors at the Brookline Farmers Market. They are part of a new generation of farmers who often come to farming with no agricultural background, armed only with their inspiration and a willingness to work hard. This year is only their second growing season! Which is hard to believe when you see their farm.

Alex sowing peas for cover crop

Alex sowing peas for cover crop

            Much of their inspiration comes from their visits to different Japanese farms that use similar practices, as well as many of the small farms around the US that practice no-till and grow intensively on small plots. The name of the game in this kind of farming is efficiency, and you can tell that just by a quick glance at Assawaga Farm. Efficient uses of beds, whether by cover cropping or replanting or stale-bedding, are all around. Alex and Yoko have also, as far as I could see, managed their time and energy very well. They run a small CSA, they sell to just one restaurant, and they sell at two farmers markets in Boston – Union Square and Brookline. That’s about all they can produce right now and all they can handle between the two of them. When I asked Alex about expansion (the actual property they own is quite a bit bigger than the area they currently farm) he indicated a spot big enough for a just few more beds that they were preparing for next season. Basically though, he said, they didn’t want to get any bigger. Their model of farming is all about managing what you have better and better, instead of trying to always acquire more and more. They don’t employ anyone except themselves and they seem pretty happy about it.

Ginger plants growing in the greenhouse

Ginger plants growing in the greenhouse

As a former farm worker myself, what struck me most walking around their ¾ acre of crops was the conspicuous absence of weeds. Weeds are one of the biggest problems most organic farmers face, especially when the farms are on a larger scale and require tractors to get all the work done. The problem in this case is that every time the farmer tills, they are stirring up weed seeds that often lie for years below the topsoil. The old seeds are brought to the surface and germinate all over the place; this is why weed control is such a big battle on many organic farms.

On their small but mighty farm, Yoko and Alex have one answer for this problem: no-till farming. How does it work?  It’s pretty self-explanatory; they just don’t till the soil. And when no-till is paired with the organic and hand-scale (ie. no tractors) methods they use, it creates an incredible potential for improvement in the soil quality. Specifically, no-till causes increased organic matter in the soil, more water retention, a better home for beneficial bugs, a more active community of mycorrhizal bacteria (which make for stronger root growth, higher plant nutrition, and better disease resistance), and maybe most important of all, way fewer weeds! Yoko and Alex aerate the soil now and then between plantings with a simple tool called a broadfork, which does not stir up the soil. This allows their beds to get some air while retaining the buildup of helpful fungi and bacteria, which will benefit their next crop. Incredibly, most of the weed seeds at the surface all germinate and are picked out within the first season of hand-scale no-till. The result? Healthier soil, healthier plants, lower CO2 emissions, less money spent on gasoline and machine repairs, and days of Yoko and Alex’s lives saved from endless weeding.

But enough technical talk! Alex and Yoko are one of the sweetest farming couples I’ve met and their farm definitely brings something different to the market. Two young people doing something that’s good for the planet, for themselves, and for us, their customers. If you haven’t already, come down to the Brookline Farmers Market and get familiar with Yoko and her infectious smile. Keep a lookout for the burdock root they have in abundance right now, great for adding a sweet, earthy flavor to soups and stir-fries. And in not too long they’re going to have ginger and peanuts! Fresh ginger and peanuts in New England! Crazy, right? Come give them a try.

Yoko and Alex holding a couple of their mouth-watering watermelons

Yoko and Alex holding a couple of their mouth-watering watermelons

 

Farm Spotlight: Nicewicz Family Farm

by Nate Harlan

     I drove up to the biggest building around and parked in front. Stepping out of my van, I spotted a solidly built human wearing jeans and a grey t-shirt. I walked over and introduced myself. “Ah,” said the man, “you’re here for the inspection.” Without another word he turned, quickly walked over to his Chevy pickup, got in, and fired it up. I hurried over to the passenger’s side, a bit worried by his pace that he might just leave without me.

One of the many fields of sweet corn

One of the many fields of sweet corn

            It turned out that the man’s name was Tommy Nicewicz, and his brother Allan (whom readers will know from the farmer’s market) had given him a heads up that I would be visiting the farm. The truck hurtled along windy asphalt and dirt roads, slowing now and then to trundle through the grassy fields and orchards, as Tommy told me about the farm. The Nicewicz family (pronounced ‘nee-shway’) have farmed on their hundred-acre property in Bolton, MA, for almost a hundred years. Tommy’s grandparents, Julian and Catherine Nicewicz, immigrated to the US from Poland in the 1920s and settled in the nearby town of Clinton. They bought the farm in Bolton in 1929 and started growing apples, peaches, and pears. The farm is now owned and operated by the four Nicewicz brothers: David, Allan, Ken, and Tommy, who are the third generation of their family to work the farm.

Peaches!

Peaches!

            Nicewicz Farm is in a hilly area of central Massachusetts, with most of their orchards and fields on something of a tilt. It makes for some very scenic walks. You might come over a hill covered in peach and nectarine trees and see their foliage sweep down the slope to stands of blueberry bushes at the bottom, which turn to flowers if you look to the right, then to squash, then maybe to a cornfield, or tomatoes, or yellow wax beans. The property is not fully planted, so there are sections of woods that break up the fields, giving some relief from the sun with the shade and flickering light.

            Having worked on farms myself, I was curious to learn something about the Nicewiczs’ day-to-day operations and farming style. One of the things Tommy told me that surprised me the most was that they had only had a well installed for irrigation for about 10 years. Apparently, before that they had been able to rely solely on the rain for their irrigation. It was a very telling sign of how much global warming has unsettled the trends in our weather patterns in recent times. For Tommy and his brothers, these changes translate to a lot more running around day after day, looking for leaks, clogs, and other problems in the drip lines that bring water from the pumps down the rows of fruit trees and crops.

Chath with a hazelnut tree

Chath with a hazelnut tree

            After my whirlwind tour of the 100-acre property, Tommy dropped me at the little farm store, quickly showed me their cold storage room, and then left me on my own to explore on foot. I soon found Chath pierSath, the Nicewiczs’ only employee, picking blueberries not far away. If you know Allan from the Brookline Market then you know Chath, too. He’s a comforting presence with a ready smile, and he made me feel right at home in the blueberries. He told me some of his story as he picked. Chath came to the US from Cambodia when he was ten. He grew up and attended school in Colorado and got a master’s in California studying group sociology. He writes poetry, he paints, he’s traveled to countries all over the world, and for the last fifteen years he has worked and lived at Nicewicz Family Farm. It seems he brings lightness and a little art to all he touches, especially on the farm. He enjoyed showing me the many little gardens he’s established in the unused corners between the fields and orchards. I was particularly excited to see the hazelnuts growing there, something I’d never seen before in real life.

A young apple orchard

A young apple orchard

            Before leaving, I was lucky enough to run into an IPM scout, Kathleen, who had been visiting for a spray consultation. The Nicewiczs practice IPM (Integrated Pest Management) at their farm, which means that while they may use synthetic chemicals in their orchards, they are as sparing and strategic as possible with their use. The idea behind IPM is that no matter whether a farm is using organic methods or not, it is always possible to misuse or overuse a soil input or pesticide, either organic or synthetic. This is particularly true for orchards like the ones the Nicewiczs own. Apples are extremely susceptible to disease and insect damage, and the amount of organic inputs used to combat these can actually be more damaging to the surrounding ecosystem than synthetic sprays are. So, using IPM, farmers and orchard managers can integrate new research in biological cycles, weather, natural enemies (eg. introducing ladybugs to combat aphids) and chemical use into their farm practices, in order to do the least harm to the surrounding land and wildlife while keeping their crops viable. Often these farms are already set up for a scale and growing methods that require at least occasional synthetic chemicals to continue, so becoming more strategic with that approach allows them to keep farming without having to totally override their business model and go broke in the process. At the end of the day, IPM growers want the same thing many organic growers want – to grow delicious food and maintain the business they already have, while preserving and hopefully improving the environment around them as much as possible.

            Nicewicz Family Farm is a beautiful and very interesting place. If you ever find yourself in Bolton, MA, I highly recommend checking out their farm store and maybe taking a walk. And please, come buy their peaches, apples, nectarines, corn, tomatoes, squash, and more at the Brookline Farmers Market! Allan and Chath would love to see you.

             

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Inspo:Expo is joining the market!

We're excited to announce that the Brookline Farmers' Market will now be providing one or more Inspo:Expo tables every Thursday!

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What is Inspo:Expo? 

Inspo:Expo launched in October 2017 with its first-ever Brookline Action Fair. Over 300 people learned about 70+ social action projects run by their neighbors. Now, Inspo:Expo has partnered with the Brookline Farmers' Market to have a rotating Inspo:Expo table to spread the word about our social action projects. We are grateful to the Farmers' Market to help make Inspo:Expo not just a moment, but a movement.

"Inspo" means "something that serves as inspiration." Interested in being an inspiration to someone else? Want to learn how to sign up for a table to spread the word about your social action project? Visit us on Facebook  to learn more. 

- Hadassah Margolis, Founder

Inspo:Expo. Get Inspired. Volunteer. Take a stand.

Meet our newest addition - Assawaga Farm!

The BFM is over the moon to introduce the community of Brookline to Assawaga Farm, enjoy the read!


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Hi, we're Yoko and Alex, the farmers at Assawaga Farm located in Putnam, CT.

Our farm is a certified organic, small scale, and human powered market garden with an emphasis on Japanese varieties of vegetables and mushrooms. While neither of us grew up on a farm, we do have a strong passion, background, and love for nature, sustainability, and anything and everything to do with food! 

Our utmost priority is to nurture and feed the soil so that our farm can be productive for generations to come and continue to produce the tastiest and most nutrient dense vegetables. To that effect, we employ no-till methods to minimize soil disturbance, maximize the use of cover crops, and aspire to build fertility within the farm.

In addition to no-till techniques, we take a lot of inspiration from Japanese organic farming methods in order to achieve our sustainability goals. We really enjoy traveling around Japan in the off season, visiting farms, and learning about the various ways in which some Japanese farmers have cultivated a harmonious relationship with the natural environment.

At the Brookline Farmers Market, we are very excited to share recipe ideas and stories from the farm and connect with the community!

 

The IMPORTANCE of BEES!

The Importance of Bees and How Everyone Can Do Their Part to Save Them

Written by: Christy Erickson

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Vegetables, fruit, nuts, oils, cotton, coffee, tea, chocolate, and livestock feed are all vital crops that humans use and rely on every day. Around 84 percent of these crops need bees to pollinate them, which equates to a global worth of $170 billion every year. But bees are worth more than just their monetary value. Many other animals rely on plants that are pollinated by bees, making bees an integral a part of a healthy ecosystem. However, their populations are rapidly declining, and their extinction would be detrimental to the Earth. Although people are a big part of the decline in the population of bees, we can help reverse the damage and save the bees.

Declining Bee Populations

Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is the culprit in the disappearance of honeybees. In the United States, CCD first emerged in 2007 and wiped out a third of honeybee colonies. Each year since then, the U.S. has suffered a loss of 40 percent. Although the cause of CCD is not fully understood, scientists believe it’s a combination of parasites, viruses, poor nutrition, and pesticide usage.

Solitary bee populations are dwindling as a result of intensive farming, insecticide use, and climate change. The habitats of wild bees are also disappearing due to modern farming practices and urbanization. Urbanization replaces fields of flowers and plants with concrete parking lots and skyscrapers. The bees need the flowers for food, and the flowers need the bee to reproduce. The destruction or loss of either disrupts their relationship.

Modern farming is a three-fold issue. The first issue affects honeybees, which are raised in one state and then transported around the country to pollinate crops. The transportation has been found to damage the development of the bees, affecting their ability to feed members of the colony. Also, the stress of transportation makes bees more susceptible to fungal infections, and the concentrated bee populations on a bee farm enables the infections to spread rapidly.

The second and third issues harm native bees and honeybees alike. Modern farming features monocultures, which means acres and acres of land are dedicated to one crop, so not only are honeybees getting poor nutrition, but the native bees are losing their food as well. Bees need to eat throughout the year, but monoculture crops bloom all at once, and when blooming is done, native bees are left with no food. Additionally, modern farming uses insecticides, pesticides, and fungicides, which are harmful to bees.

Helping in Your Garden

If you want to help bees, start by buying local produce, which bypasses the bee industry altogether. Planting a garden that attracts and protects bees is also helpful. If you’re lacking in space, plant in containers and choose the largest ones you can fit in your space. In each container, add a few different types of plants of varying colors, textures, and heights. Plant densely in your containers, and add climbing vines that produce pollen and nectar to vertical areas, such as a wall or trellis.

Keep in mind that bees need nectar and pollen, so choose plants that offer both or plant a good mix of plants that offer each. Some plants that bees love include catmint, bee balm, lavender, crocus, and anise hyssop. Remember that bees visit the same type of plant when they’re eating and they don’t want to travel far, so place similar plants in clusters rather than spreading them out. Also, choose native plants and add annuals and herbs. Don’t forget to include a place to raise their young and a source of water for bees to drink.

Gardening has benefits for bees and your family. When you garden with kids, children learn about plants and the environment. Think of it as a daily science lesson and experiment. They also learn to care for something, which teaches responsibility and helps them feel proud when they see their hard work come to life.

We need bees in order to survive because they pollinate so many of our essential crops. Because we have destroyed their habitats and negatively affected their health, bees now need us to survive too. Bees are “guardians of the food chain and the biodiversity of our species,” which is why it’s so concerning that their populations are dropping rapidly and why stepping in to help them is so vital.

 

How to BEE friendly this fall!

Fall Gardening Tips:

Keeping Your Garden Thriving and Bee Friendly

Written by: Christy Erickson

In the fall, old bumblebee colonies die and new queens find places to hibernate, such as a hole in the ground, a compost heap, or under piles of fallen leaves. Meanwhile, late-flying species, like the common carder bumblebee and the solitary ivy bee, may visit your garden’s flowers, and honeybees will pop out to feed on warm, sunny days. If you want to keep your garden a haven for bees, there are some steps you can take this fall to equip your garden for the particular needs of different species and to prepare your garden for the spring. 

 Providing Shelter, Nesting, and Food

Building a log pile or stumpery provides shelter for foraging bees and provides a nesting site for solitary bees and bumblebees. After you assemble the log pile, loosely fill empty spaces with twigs, moss, and leaves, but leave open spaces for nesting places. In your yard, leave a patch of grass to grow long near the garden, as some species prefer the ground for nesting. Bumblebees in particular like using old mouse holes, bird boxes, or thickets of grass to nest in.

While bees need pollen and nectar year-round, they especially need them in fall, as they store up to survive winter hibernation. Be sure to grow a hearty selection of late-flowering nectar plants, including asters, colchicum, Japanese anemones, salvias, lemon balm, basil, borage, and sedum. Plants that are excellent sources of both pollen and nectar include Calendula, Japanese Anemone, Nise hyssop, and clovers.

 Keeping Your Garden a Beautiful Food Source

Be sure to include plants that make your garden visually appealing in every season, such as hydrangeas, pagoda dogwoods, and Ninebarks. However, be careful about which hydrangeas you select, as some produce sterile flowers, and thus don’t feed the bees. The best hydrangeas for bees are lacetop, oak-leaved, and rough-leaf. Pagoda dogwoods have clusters of white flowers in the spring and burgundy-red foliage and blue-black berries in the fall. In the winter, their unique horizontal branching pattern catches snow, showcasing the winter wonderland.

Ninebark is a valuable nectar source for many pollinators, including native bees. Toward the end of spring, white flowers bloom, which give way to fruits of a dark glossy-red color. As winter begins, the fruits fade to a rosy tan. Once the fruit is gone, you’re left with the plant’s distinctive bark. As the plant ages, the bark exfoliates loosely and shreds in narrow strips, leaving layers of different colors exposed. Winter gives you a chance to really appreciate and admire the plant’s unique bark.

Planting New Plants in the Fall

The best time to plant spring-flowering bulbs is in the fall. This timing is best because the bulbs have ample time to grow roots during winter and come up early in the spring, and it also ensures your garden features a good supply of pollen and nectar for queen bumblebees emerging from hibernation. Crocus, snake’s head fritillary, alliums, and grape hyacinth are great sources of food for bees in the spring. Be sure to purchase bulbs from a reputable source. “Remember, second-rate bulbs produce second-rate flowers or don’t sprout at all,” says The Old Farmer’s Almanac.

Plant the bulbs after the heat of summer has passed but before the ground freezes. Check when the first fall frost will be in your area by using The Old Farmer’s Almanac’s frost date calculator. Plant the bulbs abundantly soon after purchasing them by selecting a site with plenty of sun and well-drained soil at a depth of three times the width of the bulb. Before planting, work a few inches of compost into the soil. Placement and spacing should be random for a more natural appearance. After planting, add low-nitrogen fertilizer, generously water them, and apply mulch. Don’t forget to add protection from rodents.

Although spring and summer have passed, that doesn’t mean fall brings an end to gardening. Now is a great time to add shelter and nesting sites for bees in your garden and yard. You can also plant your spring-blooming bulbs and add some plants – such as hydrangeas, pagoda dogwoods, and Ninebarks – that provide food for bees and are visually appealing throughout the seasons. Once you get your garden squared away, spruce up your front porch with some fun fall decorating ideas to welcome autumn. Soon enough, you’re neighbors will be asking you for fall gardening tips. 

SNAP MATCH is BACK!

We are over the moon...

SNAP MATCH is BACK!

Due to many caring people in our community who donated to our GoFundMe campaign, in addition to one extremely generous sizable contribution from 2 local anonymous private donors,  we are thrilled to announce that the Brookline Farmers' Market will be resuming its SNAP MATCH program immediately, and to last through the end of the 2017 season.  Please come to tomorrow's market where you can now use your HIP benefits directly at 5 of our fruit and vegetable farms as well as make use of our (10 dollar limit per market) SNAP MATCH program which doubles your dollars in ALL food sold by ALL food vendors at the market using our token system available at the Info Tent.  The Brookline Farmer's Market is so very grateful to all of our wonderful community members who rapidly and generously stepped-up to close our funding gap allowing us to continue out matching program. 

Many thanks and lots of love,

The BFM